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Neuroscience department receives grant

Emily+Fuller+%28%2719%29%2C+Linh+Luong+%28%2720%29%2C++Jenna+Reimann+%28%2720%29%2C+and+Cosette+Schneider+%28%2720%29+work+with+microscopes.
Emily Fuller ('19), Linh Luong ('20),  Jenna Reimann ('20), and Cosette Schneider ('20) work with microscopes.

Emily Fuller ('19), Linh Luong ('20), Jenna Reimann ('20), and Cosette Schneider ('20) work with microscopes.

Gillian Klein (‘20) | Chips

Gillian Klein (‘20) | Chips

Emily Fuller ('19), Linh Luong ('20), Jenna Reimann ('20), and Cosette Schneider ('20) work with microscopes.

Gillian Klein, Staff Writer

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The neuroscience department received a Roy J. Carver charitable trust grant of $200,000 on Feb. 15. They will use the grant to buy equipment to further research opportunities.

According to the Roy J. Carver Charitable website, from 1987 onwards, the Carver charitable trust has awarded $330 million in the form of 2,100 individual grants to educational and philanthropic institutions and organizations, specifically focused in the areas of biomedical and scientific research. The private philanthropic foundation was founded through the will of Roy J. Carver, former industrialist and philanthropist.

Co-founder of the neuroscience program and Professor of Biology Scott Carlson emphasized why this grant is crucial to his students’ educational experience.

“I plan to use part of the grant for my electrophysiology classes,” Carlson said. “This field studies organisms at the small level, and up to this point it’s been purely theoretical. Now it’s going to come to life.”

Neuroscience major Emily Turner (‘19) is excited about the grant.

“Neuroscience is still a relatively new field in general and encompasses many areas of study,” Turner said. “Being a part of this major means lots of hands-on lab experience, especially since there is always something new to learn.”

The neuroscience program’s success began with the combined work from the biology and psychology departments. Carlson, psychology professor Kristy Gould and assistant biology professor Stephanie Fretham designed the program to center around neuronal function and its role behavior. Students in the major are also able to choose additional courses in the major from departments like biology or psychology to specialize even further in the neuroscience major. Gould highlighted how she and her colleagues worked to create not just the neuroscience major, but also to provide students with the quantitative and assessment skills to pursue varying career avenues with the new funding.

“We are going to be purchasing equipment that students can use in laboratory work and outside the class,” Fretham said. “This presents students with opportunities to develop their skills in a new way.”

There are two main paths within the neuroscience major: psychology or biology emphasis. Students in the department can cater the major to their other studies too by selecting one or the other paths to focus on. Both paths require researching and lab experience, and Linh Luong (‘20) emphasized the impact the grant will have for all neuroscience majors.

“As for the $200,000, I think it will positively impact the present and future of the neuroscience program,” Luong said. “It will increase our research opportunities that will help us put our knowledge to use.”

Putting knowledge to use and furthering research in the medical field is one of many interests Roy J. Carver held in founding the charitable trust. According to the Roy J. Carver Charitable website, Carver was especially interested in supporting research activities to advance scientific knowledge and improve human health. According to Fretham, 

“Students may begin proposing their own independent research with the equipment we will purchase,” Fretham said. “Given the equipment to develop their own research opens doors for everyone.”

The grant has also given students like Turner the opportunity to take her knowledge further than her Luther education.

“This major has skills you can apply to other areas of interest,” Turner said. “We can start to understand what our research means for individuals and the greater community.”

Gillian Klein (‘20)I Chips
Linh Luong (‘20) (left) and Emily Fuller (‘19) (right) work with a microscope in a biology lab.

the major are also able to choose additional courses in the major from departments like biology or psychology to specialize even further in the neuroscience major. Gould highlighted how she and her colleagues worked to create not just the neuroscience major, but also to provide students with the quantitative and assessment skills to pursue varying career avenues with the new funding.

“We are going to be purchasing equipment that students can use in laboratory work and outside the class,” Fretham said. “This presents students with opportunities to develop their skills in a new way.”

There are two main paths within the neuroscience major: psychology or biology emphasis. Students in the department can cater the major to their other studies too by selecting one or the other paths to focus on. Both paths require researching and lab experience, and Linh Luong (‘20) emphasized the impact the grant will have for all neuroscience majors.

“As for the $200,000, I think it will positively impact the present and future of the neuroscience program,” Luong said. “It will increase our research opportunities that will help us put our knowledge to use.”

Putting knowledge to use and furthering research in the medical field is one of many interests Roy J. Carver held in founding the charitable trust. According to the Roy J. Carver Charitable website, Carver was especially interested in supporting research activities to advance scientific knowledge and improve human health. According to Fretham, 

“Students may begin proposing their own independent research with the equipment we will purchase,” Fretham said. “Given the equipment to develop their own research opens doors for everyone.”

The grant has also given students like Turner the opportunity to take her knowledge further than her Luther education.

“This major has skills you can apply to other areas of interest,” Turner said. “We can start to understand what our research means for individuals and the greater community.”

just the neuroscience major, but also to provide students with the quantitative and assessment skills to pursue varying career avenues with the new funding.

“We are going to be purchasing equipment that students can use in laboratory work and outside the class,” Fretham said. “This presents students with opportunities to develop their skills in a new way.”

There are two main paths within the neuroscience major: psychology or biology emphasis. Students in the department can cater the major to their other studies too by selecting one or the other paths to focus on. Both paths require researching and lab experience, and Linh Luong (‘20) emphasized the impact the grant will have for all neuroscience majors.

“As for the $200,000, I think it will positively impact the present and future of the neuroscience program,” Luong said. “It will increase our research opportunities that will help us put our knowledge to use.”

Putting knowledge to use and furthering research in the medical field is one of many interests Roy J. Carver held in founding the charitable trust. According to the Roy J. Carver Charitable website, Carver was especially interested in supporting research activities to advance scientific knowledge and improve human health. According to Fretham, 

“Students may begin proposing their own independent research with the equipment we will purchase,” Fretham said. “Given the equipment to develop their own research opens doors for everyone.”

The grant has also given students like Turner the opportunity to take her knowledge further than her Luther education.

“This major has skills you can apply to other areas of interest,” Turner said. “We can start to understand what our research means for individuals and the greater community.”

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