Feeling “Good as Hell” with Lizzo

Lizzo+made+two+grand+entrances+during+her+concert+on+Friday%2C+Sept.+28+after+her+music+did+not+start+at+the+proper+time+for+the+first+entrance.
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Feeling “Good as Hell” with Lizzo

Lizzo made two grand entrances during her concert on Friday, Sept. 28 after her music did not start at the proper time for the first entrance.

Lizzo made two grand entrances during her concert on Friday, Sept. 28 after her music did not start at the proper time for the first entrance.

Emily Turner (‘19) | Photo Bureau

Lizzo made two grand entrances during her concert on Friday, Sept. 28 after her music did not start at the proper time for the first entrance.

Emily Turner (‘19) | Photo Bureau

Emily Turner (‘19) | Photo Bureau

Lizzo made two grand entrances during her concert on Friday, Sept. 28 after her music did not start at the proper time for the first entrance.

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Musician Lizzo performed on Friday, Sept. 28 in the Regents Center. Dressed in a pink feathered robe and accompanied by two back up dancers she called “The Big Girls,” Lizzo gave a high-energy performance of upbeat songs focusing on self-love and confidence.

Some describe her music and performance as “genre-less,” as she sang, rapped, danced, gave the crowd life advice, and even played the flute.

Student Activities Council Concerts Committee Co-Chair Annie Goodroad (‘19), who was an organizer of the event, said that Lizzo’s music comes from a variety of genres, such as hip-hop, pop, and R&B.

“She’s kind of label-less in the way that she acts,” Goodroad said. “She doesn’t like to be put in a box.”

According to Goodroad, SAC Concerts chooses acts to bring to campus based on input from their committee and the availability and pricing of each artist, so they work with a list of possible artists and do not always get their first choices. She said Lizzo was their first choice for the fall concert and resulted in campus-wide excitement.

Emily Turner (‘19) | Photo Bureau
Lizzo’s performance emphasized loving yourself no matter what the haters say through music, dancing, and anecdotes.

“I think I heard more buzz about this show than I have about any show in the past few years, especially a fall show,” Goodroad said.

Goodroad said the Lizzo concert was unique and important for students on Luther’s campus because she is a solo female artist.

“I think this [was] a really good opportunity to put a female [solo] artist on stage,” Goodroad said. “I’ve already talked to students who have expressed how excited they are to have this amazing female icon on stage and how she promotes body positivity and activism in so many different ways.”

Lizzo launched her career in Minneapolis performing in various indie groups and releasing her album “Lizzobangers” in 2013. Her 2016 single “Good As Hell,” which she performed during the concert, gained mainstream success as an anthem for body positivity and independence. During the concert, Lizzo told the audience members to repeat to themselves, “I love you, you are beautiful, and you can do anything.”

Lizzo hopes her music will resonate with people who have felt underrepresented in society, something she has often felt as a Black woman. Lizzo says that she gains a lot of her confidence from surrounding herself with women and making music that inspires women.

“There is nothing that beats the feeling of being in a group of women who all respect and love each other and lift each other up with their words,” Lizzo said in a 2018 YouTube interview with DJ Smallz. “That is where my confidence comes from.”

Lizzo worked to make her confidence contagious at her performance, as she engaged directly with the audience and encouraged them to dance and sing along with some of her songs.

“She [got] onstage and she [strutted] around and she [made] everyone feel like they’re performing their own Lizzo set,” Goodroad said.

Emily Turner (‘19) | Photo Bureau
DJ Sophia Eris opened the night’s show and performed alongside Lizzo while DJing, rapping, and dancing — including jumping onto her table to dance and sing.

Audience member Kovenda Mbuale (‘22) said he enjoyed DJ Sophia Eris’s opening music and appreciated Lizzo’s positive message.

“All the motivating speeches she [gave] while she [was] performing were really good,” Mbuale said. “She’s really into self love: love your body, love yourself, believe in yourself, don’t listen to negativity.”

Audience member Riley Taylor (‘22) said that Lizzo brought something unique to campus through both her musicianship and her personality.

“How she played the flute was really cool, as an artist that was something very unique,” Taylor said. “I’ve never seen an artist just pull out an instrument like that. And as a person, I think her inner strength and how unapologetic she is about being herself is important for this campus.”

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