Luther hosts second annual Markets & Morality colloquium

Karl+Badger+%28%2719%29%2C+Rupak+Bhatt+%28%2720%29%2C+and+Ananda+Easley+%28%2719%29+participate+in+the+discussion.+
Back to Article
Back to Article

Luther hosts second annual Markets & Morality colloquium

Karl Badger ('19), Rupak Bhatt ('20), and Ananda Easley ('19) participate in the discussion.

Karl Badger ('19), Rupak Bhatt ('20), and Ananda Easley ('19) participate in the discussion.

Linh Do (‘21) | Chips

Karl Badger ('19), Rupak Bhatt ('20), and Ananda Easley ('19) participate in the discussion.

Linh Do (‘21) | Chips

Linh Do (‘21) | Chips

Karl Badger ('19), Rupak Bhatt ('20), and Ananda Easley ('19) participate in the discussion.

Linh Do, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The “Markets & Morality” discussion colloquium sponsored by the Institute for Humane Studies in partnership with Professor of Management Tim Schweizer (‘80) with took place Saturday, Oct. 20 in the Mott Room.

The day-long colloquium consisted of four sessions titled “Capitalism – For and Against,”  “Justice and Liberty,” “Critical Perspectives,”  and “Capitalism and Social Order.” Dr. Nicholas Curott from Ball State University was the discussion leader. This is the second time Luther has hosted the colloquium. The discussion continued the conversation from the first event held last spring, which featured 16 Luther students.

Schweizer invited the IHS to come to Luther and host the event. The discussion colloquium is very student-driven with the help of the discussion leader as someone who introduces the topics and rules of the discussion. This year’s colloquium was based on readings from the book “What Adam Smith Knew,” a collection of essays and chapters from different books ranging from the 18th century to today. The intention was to expose students to the moral complexities surrounding different types of market economies.

Elizabeth Edlund (‘20) found the book and the discussion really valuable as she was able to explore different viewpoints of the topics.

“It has been interesting for me to compare what people are concerned about when the United States was being founded versus how those issues are being portrayed and grappled with in today’s society,” Edlund said. “There is a wide variety of viewpoints, for example, they set up this dialogue between Adam Smith [capitalism] and Karl Marx [communism].”

Professor Schweizer thinks this event is great for students actively seeking opportunities and intellectual engagement. He also thinks the value of the discussion can be applied to a variety of real life situations for students to become better citizens in society.

“It’s really high-level thinking,” Schweizer said. “[Students] really loved it. It’s really an intellectually stimulating opportunity for the students.”

Students appreciated the way the discussion was organized within the colloquium. Ananda Easley (‘19) enjoyed how the discussion was monitored with certain hand signals to assist students to speak in a civil manner and explore sensitive subjects.

The colloquium enhanced discussion by having students signal when they had a comment to make. Those who wished to speak were put on a list and waited their turn so that they had time to consider their comments.

Although economics was the central theme of discussion, students with goals outside of the field benefited from attending the colloquium.

“I’m really interested in going into Public Health after undergraduate,” Easley said. “I thought that it would be interesting to experience looking at how health care and biology [and] medicine intersect with economics and morals and how we sometimes translate medical or healthcare concepts into economic concepts and how that relates to morality.”

Easley appreciated how addressing controversial topics helped students open up to each other.

“I think a lot of people are just really scared to talk about controversial subjects because they are afraid of getting isolated or kicked out of the community,” Easley said. “But small group discussions like this where we are forced to be civil and we are forced to interact with each other all day…we have to work together.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email