Sameer Dixit (‘94) shares career ideas from Nepal

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Sameer Dixit (‘94) shares career ideas from Nepal

Sameer Dixit ('94) began research for the Center for Molecular Dynamics Nepal in 2007.

Sameer Dixit ('94) began research for the Center for Molecular Dynamics Nepal in 2007.

Olivia Schmidt (‘22) | Chips

Sameer Dixit ('94) began research for the Center for Molecular Dynamics Nepal in 2007.

Olivia Schmidt (‘22) | Chips

Olivia Schmidt (‘22) | Chips

Sameer Dixit ('94) began research for the Center for Molecular Dynamics Nepal in 2007.

Olivia Schmidt, Staff Writer

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Co-Founder, Vice Chairperson, and Director of Research at the Center for Molecular Dynamics Nepal Sameer Dixit (‘94) gave a lecture titled “Life Sciences to Public Health: My Journey as a Researcher in Nepal” on Thursday, Oct. 25 in Valders 206.

The event was arranged as a joint project by the Center for Ethics and Public Engagement and the Center for Global Learning. Dixit recently ran into Executive Director for the Center for Global Learning and International Administration Jon Lund at a college fair in Nepal, which connected the two. Dixit was eventually invited to give a presentation at Luther regarding his research and involvement with Nepal’s public health system.

Fellow Nepal native and biology major Shaubhagya Khadka (‘20) introduced Dixit, highlighting his many achievements and discussing how those achievements impacted Nepal on a large scale.

“Despite being a gem in terms of natural beauty and resources, Nepal is short on skilled human resources, especially in the field of science and technology,” Khadka said. “During these times of desperation, scientists like Dr. Dixit are striving to develop the country where it is lacking the most.”

Khadka went on to detail Dixit’s diverse career as a co-founder of the CMDN, advisor to the Nepal Ministry of Health and Population, co-presenter of “Good Morning Nepal,” producer of the movie drama “Highway,” and lead actor in the upcoming film “Na Yeta Na Uta.”

Returning to Luther for the first time in 24 years, Dixit assured the audience that he was ecstatic to be back with the opportunity to present a brief overview of his career. He began the seminar by touching on recent events in Nepal’s history that have had far-reaching effects, including the Maoist War, the establishment of the Republic of Nepal, a major earthquake, and the Indian blockade that prevented aid from reaching those affected by it. Despite the turmoil, Nepal’s health research and services sector has seen rapid growth and development.

Dixit discussed how historically Nepal has never been at the forefront of global health research, as most of the national funds were directed toward infrastructure and any health data collected in Nepal was exported by other countries to support their research. The CMDN was born out of the desire to change this narrative.

In 2007, the CMDN was created to serve as a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting research in wildlife conservation, public health, disease surveillance, biomedical practices, and plant biotechnology. Dixit is particularly enthused by his current research into antimicrobial resistance and infectious disease research in general.

Jessi Labenski (‘22) was inspired by Dixit’s story and the passion that allowed him to create a unique and meaningful career.

“I was so impressed that he was able to create his research center from basically nothing,” Labenski said. “He had a serious passion for public health in Nepal, so much so that he was willing to skip his salary for five years in order to make the research center a reality.”

Dixit offered advice for anyone interested in entering into health, biomedical, or population research.

“Biomedical research and public health are all interlinked in one way or another,” Dixit said in the lecture. “When I’m doing biomedical research, I’m focusing only on that. If you have the interest this is an excellent field. You can contribute to biomedical health sciences in many ways to understand what’s causing diseases by having some basic knowledge. It doesn’t matter what background you have as long as you have the passion.”

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