Luther College Chips

Students reflect on previous international leadership work

%5BLEFT+TO+RIGHT%5D+Anila+Bano+%28%E2%80%9820%29%2C+Rebecka+Green+%28%E2%80%9820%29%2C+and+Sthela+Gun+Holly+Hanitrinirina+%28%E2%80%9819%29+participate+in+a+rountable+discussion.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Students reflect on previous international leadership work

[LEFT TO RIGHT] Anila Bano (‘20), Rebecka Green (‘20), and Sthela Gun Holly Hanitrinirina (‘19) participate in a rountable discussion.

[LEFT TO RIGHT] Anila Bano (‘20), Rebecka Green (‘20), and Sthela Gun Holly Hanitrinirina (‘19) participate in a rountable discussion.

Kyle Brusco (‘22) | Chips

[LEFT TO RIGHT] Anila Bano (‘20), Rebecka Green (‘20), and Sthela Gun Holly Hanitrinirina (‘19) participate in a rountable discussion.

Kyle Brusco (‘22) | Chips

Kyle Brusco (‘22) | Chips

[LEFT TO RIGHT] Anila Bano (‘20), Rebecka Green (‘20), and Sthela Gun Holly Hanitrinirina (‘19) participate in a rountable discussion.

Kyle Brusco, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






On Nov. 28th, three Luther students and one Luther alum hosted a roundtable discussion titled “International Opportunities: Roundtable on Summer Experiences,” in which students discussed their experiences with peace projects and leadership conferences abroad on Nov. 28 in Olin 102.

Anila Bano (‘20) participated in an international leadership conference in Pakistan, Rebecka Green (‘19) participated in the Peace Scholar Program in Norway, and Sthela Gun Holly Hanitrinirina (‘19) led a Davis Peace Project program in Madagascar. Former human resources manager for the African Union Gaone Masire (‘82) moderated the discussion.

The students’ experiences abroad varied greatly, but they shared the common theme of promoting dialogue, peace, and finding solutions to resolve international and domestic conflicts. Hanitrinirina took part in the Davis Project for Peace, a program that allows students to design their own projects that will promote equality and peace.

“One thing that I learned during the conference was that whether we are a developed or a developing country, we share the same problems. We have to collaborate because we are all connected.”

– Anila Bano (‘20)

Hanitrinirina is from Madagascar and wanted to confront issues that affect her home country, so she decided to create a project addressing the lack of literacy in Madagascar. She first made contact with youth leaders across Madagascar and formed teams to carry out her project. She then implemented her ideas across Madagascar. During the roundtable, Hanitrinirina described this program.

“In Madagascar, many of the people cannot read and write,” Hanitrinirina said. “So in order to make a difference, we had to come up with an idea that doesn’t look like writing. We came up with the idea to draw the 30 basic human rights. We drew them based on Madagasci culture. For example, in Madagascar, women do not typically serve in the military. So we drew women serving in the military to promote gender equality. We printed these drawings and others like them, and turned them into a kit for our youth leaders to distribute.”

Green had a very different experience, as she took part in the Peace Scholar program in Norway. The Peace Scholar program selects students from six Lutheran colleges across America and brings them to Norway for a seven-week academic and discussion-based program based in Lillehammer and Oslo.

In Lillehammer, Green and her fellow students took part in the Nansen Dialogue Network. They engaged in structured discussions among themselves and students from many other countries, including Colombia, and many from the Balkans region.

Afterwards, they traveled to Oslo, where they took a course at the University of Oslo International Summer School and were introduced to general methods of peace and conflict studies.

Bano took part in the first ever International Youthopia Conference in Pakistan. The conference is a seven-day program with panels and discussion groups. The conference is meant to bring youth leaders from around the world to discuss important global issues and build connections with people from other countries and cultures. Bano believes it is important to get to know people with different backgrounds and experiences.

“One thing that I learned during the conference was that whether we are a developed or a developing country, we share the same problems,” Bano said. “We have to collaborate because we are all connected.”

While each person had a vastly different experience abroad, their trips all shared common themes of promoting dialogue and problem-solving. Each of their trips provided an avenue to build relationships and make a difference in the world. Connecting with people from other cultures and countries was very important to them.

“We are all connected, despite how different we are,” Bano said. “At the conference in Pakistan, we talked about the same issues we talk about here. We are all in it together, and in order to solve them we all have to contribute.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Leave a Comment

Comments are closed.

The student news site of Luther College in Decorah, Iowa