Counseling Services hosts discussion on Netflix show “You”

Lacy+Jorgensen+%2C+Sexual+Assault+Advocate+at+Riverview+Center%2C++leads+discussion++on+the+Lifetime+and++Netflix+Show+%22You%22+on+Feb+13.
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Counseling Services hosts discussion on Netflix show “You”

Lacy Jorgensen , Sexual Assault Advocate at Riverview Center,  leads discussion  on the Lifetime and  Netflix Show

Lacy Jorgensen , Sexual Assault Advocate at Riverview Center, leads discussion on the Lifetime and Netflix Show "You" on Feb 13.

Hope Gilbertson (‘21) | Chips

Lacy Jorgensen , Sexual Assault Advocate at Riverview Center, leads discussion on the Lifetime and Netflix Show "You" on Feb 13.

Hope Gilbertson (‘21) | Chips

Hope Gilbertson (‘21) | Chips

Lacy Jorgensen , Sexual Assault Advocate at Riverview Center, leads discussion on the Lifetime and Netflix Show "You" on Feb 13.

Hope Gilbertson, Staff Writer

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Counseling Services, along with advocates from Helping Services Domestic Violence Resource Center and Riverview Center led a discussion on the recent Lifetime and Netflix show “You,” on Feb. 13.

“You,” follows the lives of young adults living in New York City. The audience watches the events transpire through the viewpoint of the protagonist and stalker, Joe, by hearing his inner thoughts and reasoning. He falls for a young woman, Beck, who is unsatisfied with her personal relationships. Nearly every character in the show confronts personal challenges. The audience witnesses their lives and sees the signs and effects of unhealthy relationships.

Counseling Services counselor Bobbi-Jo Molokken thinks it’s important to consider having discussions about healthy coping mechanisms when viewing shows like “You.”

“In talking with the advocates from Riverview Center and Helping Services, we know that students are binge-watching this show,” Molokken said. “Much like we did with the show ’13 Reasons Why,’ we felt having a discussion on campus about it can be helpful to process what we are watching and any positive and problematic impacts the show may have.”

Maddie Davis (‘22) attended the discussion and feels it’s important to examine a show with this nature in great detail and to not avoid its sensitive aspects.

“While the show is created for entertainment purposes, it opens up opportunity for more,” Davis said. “It opens up opportunity for discussion and overall further education on touchy topics such as abuse and unhealthy relationships.”

Hope Gilbertson (‘22) | Chips
Tamar Tedla (’20) Emma Buddecke (’21), and Megan Cupersmith (’20) attended the group discussion.

Molokken also knows it’s dangerous to romanticize TV shows with dark messages.

“For me, watching the show, the signs of unhealthy relationships are extremely obvious in almost all of the relationships in the show,” Molokken said. “However, in hearing how some individuals are glamorizing or justifying really unhealthy behaviors, I think it’s really important to continue to provide education on campus around healthy and unhealthy relationship behaviors.”

Neve Heimer-Lang (‘19), attended the event and felt it was timely.

“It is almost Valentine’s Day,” Heimer-Lang (‘19) said. “I think stuff about unhealthy relationships is important to discuss always but especially during this time.”

The discussion ended with attendees asking advocates questions concerning the show. Counseling Services also had various sources for further information.

Students are encouraged to contact Domestic Abuse Resource Center crisis line at (563) 382-2989 and Riverview Sexual Assault Services crisis line at (888) 557-0310 in emergencies.

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